Graphical vi/vim functional keys sheet

vi is a free software screen-oriented text editor written by Bill Joy in 1976 for an early BSD release.Vim, which stands for Vi IMproved, is an open source, multiplatform text editor extended from vi. It was first released by Bram Moolenaar in 1991. Since then, numerous features have been added to Vim, many of which are helpful in editing program source code. Vim and vi are very popular editors for […]

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Clean up your Ubuntu with deborphan

If you want to clean up your Ubuntu or Debian machine and delete unnecessary (orphaned) deb packages you can use utility deborphan. It finds packages that have no packages depending on them. The default operation is to search only within the libs and oldlibs sections to hunt down unused libraries. Install deborphan with command sudo apt-get install deborphan and then let’s proceed with cleaning up. To delete unnecessary libraries just […]

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Summarize system resourses used by Linux application

Linux utility time is used to run programs and summarize system resources usage. time runs the program COMMAND with any given arguments ARG… When COMMAND finishes, time displays information about resources used by COMMAND (on the standard error output, by default). If COMMAND exits with non-zero status, time displays a warning message and the exit status. The following example shows how to check how much time it takes to copy […]

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Buddi: track your finances in a simple way

Buddi is a personal finance and budgeting program, aimed at those who have little or no financial background. In making this software, author has attempted to make things as simple as possible, while still retaining enough functions to satisfy most home users.   To my mind the idea of using such applications to manage personal finances makes sense definitely. But not all of us have a lot of time and […]

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Conky: light-weight Linux system monitor

Conky is a light-weight and highly configurable system monitor for X. It can monitor many different aspects of your Linux computer. You choose what to monitor and you choose where the monitor is displayed on your desktop through use of a configuration file .conkyrc. As for me I like to have it at the top right of my display. To get conky running in Ubuntu execute: sudo apt-get install conky […]

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