BMW migrates FROM Unix on race to Intel

Motor giant BMW will migrate about a third of its fleet of proprietary Unix servers to commodity Intel machines with Linux and Windows to take on the workloads. Eckard Schiffler from BMW’s group data center in Asia said the global company has some 80,000 desktops and 6000 servers supporting about 4500 applications. “BMW IT is highly standardized in both infrastructure and processes,” he said. With three main data centers in […]

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How to restart/stop/start networking in FreeBSD

FreeBSD® is an advanced operating system for x86 compatible (including Pentium® and Athlon™), amd64 compatible (including Opteron™, Athlon™64, and EM64T), UltraSPARC®, IA-64, PC-98 and ARM architectures. It is derived from BSD, the version of UNIX® developed at the University of California, Berkeley. It is developed and maintained by a large team of individuals. Additional platforms are in various stages of development. FreeBSD 5.x/6.x includes netif shell script located in /etc/rc.d/ […]

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Linux/Unix coreutils command 'paste' to merge lines of files

Unix and Linux GNU coreutils command paste can be useful to merge corresponding or subsequent lines of files. Here is simple example of it’s usage: viper@viper-laptop:~$ cat /tmp/test pop pop1 pop2 viper@viper-laptop:~$ cat /tmp/test1 1 2 3 4 viper@viper-laptop:~$ paste /tmp/test /tmp/test1 pop 1 pop1 2 pop2 3 4

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Get FreeBSD ports tree after OS installation

Many new FreeBSD users face the problem when /usr/ports directory is missing just after OS installation is finished. Here are three ways from FreeBSD Handbook to obtain ports collection.

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Two-way conversion of Unix time (seconds since 1970) and regular time

I found using of Unix time to be very useful in various shell scripts and here are two simple commands to convert Unix/Linux date command to Unix time format and back to regular formating: To convert Unix time to simple (regular) time please use: date -u –date=”1970-01-01 1187769064 sec GMT” where 1187769064 is input Unix time. The output will be: Wed Aug 22 07:51:04 UTC 2007 To get Unix time […]

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