Install nfdump and nfsen netflow tools in Linux

Using nfsen it is possible to view IP traffic statistics on Linux interfaces including the graphs showing data sent and received (see the screenshot to the right) as well as historical information about all data transfers. So after you’ve configured nfsen and nfdump to monitor traffic on certain Linux server or router you’ll be able to answer the following example questions: What IP was downloading data through 48161 last Wednesday? […]

Read more →

 

FAQ: How to install manual pages in Solaris?

In order to use install man pages for various commands in Solaris it is necessary to get two packages: SUNWman and SUNWdoc. You can check if they are already installed using commands ‘pkginfo SUNWdoc’ and ‘pkginfo SUNWman’, or just try ‘man man‘. If they are not present in your system you can install them from Solaris 10 cd-rom (I guess you’re using exactly this version of Sun’ operating system): 1. […]

Read more →

 

Best of Linux Cheat Sheets

Below list of Linux cheat sheets can be used by everybody who administer Linux operating system including beginners/newbies and bearded gurus. PDF | Command Line Interface (CLI), Security, Networking Unix/Linux Command Reference by fosswire.com THE ONE PAGE LINUX MANUAL (A summary of useful Linux commands) LINUX System Call Quick Reference LINUX Admin Quick Reference Linux quick reference card Linux Shell quick reference guide Linux Security Quick Reference Guide tcpdump cheat […]

Read more →

 

FAQ: How to scrollback in GNU SCREEN?

Q: I was compiling kernel using GNU Screen utility but something happened during the compilation and I want to see full error’s output but I can’t just scrollback using Ctrl+PageUp. How to scrollback in GNU Screen? A: In GNU Screen press Ctrl + a + [ to enter Copy Mode, then scroll up/down using keys j or k. Below are some other navigation keys: h - Move the cursor left […]

Read more →

 

Another 10 good Unix habits to pickup

Well, IBM publishes a new article about useful Unix command line habits as a follow-up to Michael Stutz’s article. I promise that after reading this article you will say something like “A-ha, I didn’t know you could do that!” Here is the part of that staff: The !$ command returns the last argument used with a command. But what happens if you have a command that used arguments and you […]

Read more →